The Risk in Partnerships

When two or more people get into business together there is risk that needs constant assessment. Partners in business together must have the following characteristics:

 

  1. Must be logical in their thinking. It is not all about one partner. Sometimes the logical business decision can disadvantage one partner over the other(s). It is critical that the partner being disadvantaged is logical in their thinking to separate what is right for the business from what is right for the disadvantaged partner.
  2. Must eventually be at peace with all decisions. Although it is healthy to have different opinions and constructive arguments, eventually all partners must understand that a decision needs to be made and although it may be contrary to one partners opinion the dissenting partners must be at peace with the decisions.
  3. Partners cannot be bitter if they get diluted. There are many times when a business needs more money and the partners have to ante up. Sometimes there are partners who do not have the money or do not want to invest in their business at the particular point in time when money is needed. These partners who do not participate financially cannot be bitter when their stock ownership gets diluted. If it only fair to the partners who are risking the additional capital that they get stock for the risk they are taking.
  4. Partners must understand the rough and tumble world of commerce. Partners must be prepared for troubled times in the business. Exemplified by, lower salaries, difficult cash flow problems and personal guarantees. The character of the partners must be in harmony during these periods.
  5. Only one person can run the company. It is a good idea for one partner to take the lead role in the business. Be viewed by the suppliers, customers and employees as the point person. Sometimes this can make the partners not taking the lead role feel inferior and bitter.
  6. Not all partners are created equal with regard to salary. Partners must understand that different partners take different skills to the table. Some of those skills are more valuable to the business than others. The business needs to pay more money to the more valuable skill sets. You would not pay a store manager the same as a CEO. If one partner brings store management skills to the table that is valuable, but can be replaced with another store manager if the salary is out of hand. This is difficult for many partners to understand.

 

Sometimes business partners will call upon the CFO to be their mediator when they’re having a dispute, but partners need to keep their eyes open when they enter into business deals.

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